Thrash Lab

Diving into Gaming

I’ve always had a hazy memory of the first time I played Assassins Creed. It was possibly around 2008, sometime late after the first game had arrived into the public eye. I was a young girl desperate to attempt to fit in with a few of the older guys at friend’s house, and so I picked up the controller with every attempt at looking like I was comfortable with the controller in my hand. I have thickly clouded memories of falling, being stabbed, drowning, and generally finding every possible method of being killed. I remember being praised for being creative, for apparently, I had managed to lose in ways they never thought possible. Young as I was, I didn’t understand sarcasm; I couldn’t understand why we hadn’t become best friends until the next time I picked up a controller.

There is a unique relationship that I share with all the video games that I have played since childhood and of the various characters that have had a huge role in shaping my life and developing my ambitions for a future in advertising and web designing. Yes, I am in the hopes of taking it up as a career though nothing is in the pipelines currently but I have made up my mind and not relegate myself to judi poker online, which can only increase vices in a person.

Years later, in the summer of 2011, I fell in love. At a friend’s house, I noticed the second game in the series, simply labeled Assassins Creed II. Once again, more than eager to prove myself, I insisted that her little brother fire up the game, and eagerly gripped the controller in my hand. Once again, after years of attempting to convince everyone that I could just be ‘one of the guys’ because I knew that the X meant jump, I managed to revert back several stages of evolution. Yet somehow, through that mess of embarrassing failures, I fell in love with the game.

I fell in love with the main character, Ezio Auditore, the parkour-styled moves, and admittedly, the historical accuracy. That night, I brought the game home, and finished within a couple of weeks.

The story followed Ezio’s journey through Italy, first seeking revenge for the death of his family, then unveiling a drawn-out war between the Templars and the Assassins, a war which he becomes a part of, fighting as an Assassin for the freedom of the people. Yet this proved only to be point of the plot rather than the plot itself, interwoven with the story of Desmond Miles, through whose genetic memory the story is being exposed, and the elusive presence of Subject 16.

After I finished the second game, there was no turning back. I splurged on a PS3, bought brotherhood, which I finished in even less time than the Assassins creed II, played the first game immediately after, then got Revelations as a Christmas gift. I’ve played each game at least twice now. It was my male friends, apparently delighted that I could put knowledge behind my ravings now, forcibly spread my interest to other games. Since then, I’ve been laden with titles such as Heavy Rain, Uncharted, The Dragon Age origins, and I haven’t been able to stop.

Scroll To Top